Tag Archives: society

Educated into imbecility

There was undoubtedly a strong prophetic anointing on the words of Malcolm Muggeridge—he perceived God’s perspective on the movements in society long before they were obvious to the majority. On a recent Ravi Zacharias podacst I heard him quoting these words of Muggeridge,

“So the final conclusion would surely be that whereas other civilizations have been brought down by attacks of barbarians from without, ours had the unique distinction of training its own destroyers at its own educational institutions, and then providing them with facilities for propagating their destructive ideology far and wide, all at the public expense. Thus did Western Man decide to abolish himself, creating his own boredom out of his own affluence, his own vulnerability out of his own strength, his own impotence out of his own erotomania, himself blowing the trumpet that brought the walls of his own city tumbling down, and having convinced himself that he was too numerous, labored with pill and scalpel and syringe to make himself fewer. Until at last, having educated himself into imbecility, and polluted and drugged himself into stupefaction, he keeled over–a weary, battered old brontosaurus–and became extinct.”

Malcolm Muggeridge, Vintage Muggeridge: Religion and Society

 

The lies teenagers believe

I have not read Dr. Koch’s book only this summary found here. However I did find this summary revealing and not surprising.

In Screens and Teens: Connecting with our Kids in a Wireless World, Dr. Kathy Koch discusses the five lies that technology can make us believe. Our children are particularly susceptible to these lies, digital natives that they are; but we’re hardly immune either! Here are the five lies as illuminated in Dr. Koch’s excellent book:

1. I am the center of my own universe. Technology’s constant pandering to the consumer reinforces the lie that life is all about me, rather than about God.

2. I deserve to be happy all the time. As fantastic as the increased speed of our devices is, immediate gratification can be dangerous, leading to other impulsive behaviors.

3. I must have choices. In a world of ever-multiplying choices, we can begin to feel that choice is the ultimate virtue, that we have a right to always have our way.

4. I am my own authority. Technology reinforces the temptation to only look within oneself to find truth and meaning instead of seeking counsel from friends, Scripture, and mentors.

5. Information is all I need. Having information and being informed are very different. Help your students know how to use what they know with wisdom.